Category Archives: In the News

Remembering Mary

In my current job as an entertainment news producer I report on many celebrity deaths. Mourning becomes a casualty to getting the news out quickly and getting reaction from family and fans. But when I heard Mary Tyler Moore died Wednesday, I took a moment to grieve.

I was too young to watch “The Dick Van Dyke Show” when it was in its original run, but I watched reruns and always liked Mary’s spunk. Then she became a feminist icon starring in the very originally-titled “Mary Tyler Moore Show.”

mary-tyler-moore

Mary Richards was one of the reasons I wanted to become a journalist, and more specifically, a TV news producer. I’m sure I’m not the only one of my sister colleagues who was inspired by her moxy and independence….her work ethic and heart.

And how about that cool apartment and enviable wardrobe? She was the first to have a giant letter “M” on the wall, and no one ever looked better in a suede vest.

She knew how to deliver a punch line with a quiet power, and how to stand back and let her quirky co-stars have their moments. She and Rhoda created a road map for female friendships, while proving you could have a successful, happy life without needing a man.

mary-tm

Thanks for that Mary.

I met Mary once, while covering the red carpet of the Tony Awards in New York in 2002. I jumped at the chance to talk to her.

She was taller than I thought she’d be and impeccably dressed in a classic black suit that was sophisticated, and age appropriate yet sexy. I asked her a bunch of questions which she answered dutifully.

mary-tyler-moore2

As we wrapped up we had an exchange that I will never forget. I asked her if she enjoyed getting dressed up for big events like the Tonys and she looked me straight in the eye and said “No, I hate it!”

I was so surprised, as she seemed so in her element. But she said she’d rather be home with her dogs. Then I said ” But you look fabulous!” and she cocked her head to the side and smiled and said, ” Well, there’s that.” And then she glided away.

That dame knew how to take a compliment!

I’ll miss Mary, and what she represented to young girls like me: Someone who was smart and capable, glamorous and self-reliant. She made many of us believe we’re gonna make it after all.

 

 

 

Remembering 9/11– where I was that day

Thought this was worth sharing again….the pain still raw after all these years.

I knew today was September 11th, but hearing the victims’ relatives reading the names on TV of those they lost that horrific day 11 years ago always makes me cry.

Even for the fifteenth time, hearing the names breaks my heart and brings me right back to that Manhattan day. It was a gorgeous, crisp autumn morning and the sky was remarkably clear and blue, before it exploded into fire and smoke and misery.

No one will ever forget where they were that day when the world was forever changed.

NeverForget-09-11-2001

I was living in Manhattan, working at Fox News, and Jacob was a year old. I was so grateful that Wilson was working uptown. He had walked down many stairs from his office to escape the chaos after the first bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993.

In 2001, his office shut down and he eventually walked home with the throngs of confused, frightened people crowding the streets. I didn’t see him much that week and when I finally got home, I was obsessed with watching the news coverage, trying (in vain) to make sense of what happened…trying to feel the pain I had forced myself to numb while at work.

After the towers fell, I basically lived at my desk for a week as we tried to tell the most shocking, tragic, and intense story of our lives.

One memory seared in my mind is when we lost contact with our reporter– Rick Leventhal– and his cameraman and sat truck operator after the first tower collapsed. In standard operating procedure, we had sent them downtown to cover the story as soon as the planes hit the towers.

But when the tower collapsed, all we saw was a huge plume of brown smoke envelop Rick as he was getting ready to report live. We could hear screaming and then the cameraman dropped the camera on the ground but eerily left it recording on the live feed to the newsroom (not on air.)

leventhal-sept-11

We stared in horror as we saw the sidewalk view of a street filled with smoke and ash, and then the feed went to black and we lost contact with the crew.

I don’t remember how long it was before we heard from the crew, and there was a lot of silent guilt for sending them into unspeakable danger and uncertainty. After what seemed like agonizing hours, we found out they were safe after hunkering down in a nearby building.

It was the most relief I remember feeling covering any news story.

When I was able to get out of the office to catch a few hours of sleep, I could smell the ash and smoke in the air and saw the glazed, damaged looks of my fellow New Yorkers.

I remember seeing the “missing” flyers posted all over the city, and making trips to CVS to get contact lens solution, wipes, rubber gloves to bring to our local fire house to feel like we were doing something to help.

There are so many stories about the thousands of people touched by the attack. For the 10th anniversary, I wrote a series of articles for AOL’s Patch.com. I interviewed a New Jersey man who lost his brother-in-law and was so moved by the experience that when he retired a few years later, he started a fund to support people in crisis in his local community and support cultural events that bring people together.

TJ hargrave on carpoolcandy.com

T.J was a child actor. He had a regular part of he Guiding Light in the early 198’s and Kevin Bacon took over the role after he left. He was also in several TV movies and commercials.

T.J. was a child actor who had a regular part on “Guiding Light” in the early 80’s. Kevin Bacon took over the role after he left. He was also in several TV movies and ads.
You can read about TJ Hargrave– who was at his office at Cantor Fitzgerald when he died– and his brother-in-law’s inspiring story here. One of TJ’s daughters read his name this morning at the World Trade Center Memorial. I’m sure he would be so proud of her courage.

I also had the opportunity to interview several South Orange, New Jersey firefighters last year — some of whom filled in at a Brooklyn fire house in the days following the attack. They tell a compelling tale with some chilling details about their experience in New York and what it’s like for them and their families to face risk every day. That story is here.

9-11-never-forget-1

I always feel helpless when watching the families of 9/11 victims grieving. But reading these stories is a way to keep the memories of those we lost– and those who risked their lives to help– alive.

One thing we can do is never forget.

Remembering 9/11: where I was that day

I knew today was September 11th but I got the kids up and off to school like it was any other day. When I returned from the bus stop, the TV was on and the victims’ relatives were reading the names of those they lost on that horrific day 11 years ago.

I was weeping within minutes. Even for the tenth time, hearing the names breaks my heart and brings me right back to that Manhattan day. It was a gorgeous, crisp autumn morning and the sky was remarkably clear and blue, before it exploded into fire and smoke and misery.

No one will ever forget where they were that day when the world was forever changed.

I was living in Manhattan, working at Fox News, and Jacob was a year old. I was so grateful that Wilson was working uptown. He had walked down many stairs from his office to escape the chaos after the first bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993.

In 2001, his office shut down and he eventually walked home with the throngs of confused, frightened people crowding the streets. I didn’t see him much that week and when I finally got home, I was obsessed with watching the news coverage, trying (in vain) to make sense of what happened…trying to feel the pain I had forced myself to numb while at work.

NeverForget-09-11-2001

After the towers fell, I basically lived at my desk for a week as we tried to tell the most shocking, tragic, and intense story of our lives.

One memory seared in my mind is when we lost contact with our reporter– Rick Leventhal– and his cameraman and sat truck operator after the first tower collapsed. In standard operating procedure, we had sent them downtown to cover the story as soon as the planes hit the towers.

But when the tower collapsed, all we saw was a huge plume of brown smoke envelop Rick as he was getting ready to report live. We could hear screaming and then the cameraman dropped the camera on the ground but eerily left it recording on the live feed to the newsroom (not on air.)

We stared in horror as we saw the sidewalk view of a street filled with smoke and ash, and then the feed went to black and we lost contact with the crew.

I don’t remember how long it was before we heard from the crew, and there was a lot of silent guilt for sending them into unspeakable danger and uncertainty.  After what seemed like agonizing hours, we found out they were safe after hunkering down in a nearby building.

It was the most relief I remember feeling covering any news story.

When I was able to get out of the office to catch a few hours of sleep, I could smell the ash and smoke in the air and saw the glazed, damaged looks of my fellow New Yorkers.

I remember seeing the “missing” flyers posted all over the city, and making trips to CVS to get contact lens solution, wipes, rubber gloves to bring to our local fire house to feel like we were doing something to help.

There are so many stories about the thousands of people touched by the attack. For the 10th anniversary, I wrote a series of articles for AOL’s Patch.com. I interviewed a New Jersey man who lost his brother-in-law and was so moved by the experience that when he retired a few years later, he started a fund to support people in crisis in his local community and support cultural events that bring people together.

TJ hargrave on carpoolcandy.com

T.J. was a child actor who had a regular part on “Guiding Light” in the early 80’s. Kevin Bacon took over the role after he left. He was also in several TV movies and ads.

You can read about TJ Hargrave– who was at his office at Cantor Fitzgerald when he died– and his brother-in-law’s inspiring story here. One of TJ’s daughters read his name this morning at the World Trade Center Memorial. I’m sure he would be so proud of her courage.

I also had the opportunity to interview several South Orange, New Jersey firefighters last year — some of whom filled in at a Brooklyn fire house in the days following the attack. They tell a compelling tale with some chilling details about their experience in New York and what it’s like for them and their families to face risk every day. That story is here.

9-11-never-forget-1

I always feel helpless when watching the families of 9/11 victims grieving. But reading these stories is a way to keep the memories of those we lost– and those who risked their lives to help– alive.

One thing we can do is never forget.

So long Jon Stewart, it’s been real

The host of The Daily Show has written us all a “Dear Jon” letter. I’d like to send it back but I don’t think it would do any good. There’s not much to say except I’ll miss Jon Stewart dearly.

the daily show with jon stewart logo on carpoolcandy.com

That short little bucket of brains made me see things more clearly, while keeping me laughing for 16 years. I’m a journalist who has written and produced news stories for a very long time (saying the number of years just makes me feel old)  but Jon Stewart often helped me digest and understand the news in a way traditional news outlets could not.

He and his amazing writing staff were able to boil down the facts and make sense of them, often when world events made no sense at all.

He got us through 9/11 and the Newtown school shooting. He made us laugh at Bush 43’s awkward snicker and reminded us relentlessly that Dick Cheney– whom he pegged as the Darth Vader of the Iraq War — shot his friend in the face.

He hammered at ObamaCare, even challenging HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius to log on to the glitch-plagued website on a laptop during her interview. He had a way of nailing lots of politicians who dared to sit in his hot seat, while showing the utmost respect… and winking at us, his loyal audience.

daily show jon stewart ticket on carpoolcandy.com

My ticket to see The Daily Show last year. (sigh) The last time we would be together.

Not just a comedian and host, he was an agent of change. Many hold him largely responsible for drawing attention to Congress failing to pass a bill to help veterans and 9/11 first responders get health care. After TDS devoted several segments to the debacle, a bill got passed.

I’m sure Trevor Noah is a talented, smart guy. I trust the people at Comedy Central know what they’re doing, and I’m certain Stewart wouldn’t allow that desk to be sullied by someone who couldn’t handle it.

daily show jon stewart studio on carpoolcandy.com

Here I am on the set of the show, eagerly awaiting Jon, who was funny and easy with the audience. This set will be donated to the Newseum for posterity.

But I’m going to miss tuning into TDS and seeing Jon and his team giving us their unique take on current events, and asking the intelligent and less obvious questions of celebrities and newsmakers. He created a cultural phenomenon that has hugely influenced comedy and politics forever.

One of Wilson’s big complaints about me is that I hoard TV shows on the DVR, often leaving no room to record essential Michigan football games or historical documentaries. Right now, I have no less than 60 TDS episodes stacked up. I’ve tried to weed through and delete but I’m too worried I’ll miss something (there’s that FOMO again!)

His bits are funny even months later and you get a lot of bang for your buck: he makes me laugh and I always learn something.

Now I’ll treasure these old episodes and parse them out slowly, so I don’t have to rip the band-aid off tonight, when he appears for the last time.

Stewart’s final episode will be star-studded, nostalgic, and undoubtedly very funny. And I hear Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band are playing, so that could soften the blow.

I’m going to miss you Jon. Hope this break gives you the moment of Zen you deserve.

 

Black leaders raise $2.1 million so kids can see ‘Selma’ for free

I was working on a piece this weekend that I have to share. It’s a great story to commemorate the Martin Luther King holiday,  and there’s still time to take advantage of an inspiring program called “Selma for Students,” in cities all across the country.

I’m working today, but Wilson is taking the kids to see ‘Selma,’ thanks to some amazing business leaders who had an idea “that had legs,” as one of them told me.

It’s rare that a good idea discussed over dinner with friends actually turns into something big, and raising more than two million bucks in less than 2 weeks because you believe in educating our youth is pretty special.

Paramount Pictures

Paramount Pictures

Here are the deets:

Many students across the country will mark Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday this year in a more meaningful way than just enjoying a day off from school.

That’s the goal of Paramount Pictures and scores of African-American business leaders who have sponsored free screenings for students in select cities of the new movie, ”Selma,” about King’s 1965 civil rights march.

 It all started at a dinner party on New Year’s Eve, when a group of prominent African-American executives were discussing the historical significance of  “Selma,” and how important it is for young people to see the story come alive on-screen. 

Soon dinner table chatter became a movement and within a week, 27 business executives created a fund to allow some 27,000 middle school and high school freshman students in New York City to see the film for free at participating theaters starting January 8. Seventh, 8th and 9th grade students were required to show a school ID or a report card to receive a free ticket.

”The reaction has been incredible,” Megan Colligan, President of Marketing and Distribution at Paramount– the film’s distributor– told FoxNews.com. “There’s something so special in not planning it, it really came from organic honest inspiration and then people were willing to dedicate themselves to doing something that’s never been done before. “

When the New York theaters sold out quickly in the first weekend, and the fund continued to grow as news of the program spread, the leaders expanded it to 75,000 tickets. Then Paramount and the executive sponsors began to think bigger.

By Sunday night (Jan 18,) the Selma For Students efforts had raised $2.1 million and distributed at least 285,000 free tickets in 24 cities– from Nashville to San Francisco.

“There’s a common identity with this cause and this history and everyone wanted to touch it. It’s been an incredible outpouring of support,” one of the business leaders, Fred Terrell, told FoxNews.com. “It’s something I’ve never seen, it’s been so infectious, and it gives you a sense there’s a cohesive quality to the African-American business community. They want to be part of educating our youth and telling that story to young people,” Terrell, Vice Chairman at Credit Suisse, said.

Executives leading the “Selma” for Students charge hail from many companies representing finance, law, and media—including American Express, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, BET Networks, and Essence Magazine.

As school, church, and youth groups gobble up available tickets, organizations in many communities nationwide have coordinated campaigns to find more African-American business leaders to underwrite more free tickets to keep the movement going.

Paramount Pictures

Paramount Pictures

“Selma” details the events surrounding Dr. King’s march from Selma, Alabama to Montgomery, which resulted in one of the most powerful victories in the civil rights movement–President Lyndon Johnson signing the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Despite brutal opposition, King and his non-violent supporters made history as they courageously fought for change.

It was an epic moment the program sponsors wanted today’s youth to understand. “It would be a shame for such a great a historical vehicle to be in the marketplace and not get the opportunity to have a community meeting around it. The story is as relevant today as it was in 1965,” Terrell said.

“It’s a great opportunity to learn more about my history,” Joshua Phillips, 12, a student at Forest Street Elementary School in Orange, New Jersey said at a recent “Selma” screening with his classmates.

Several institutions in New York City and other communities are supporting the project by hosting viewings and discussions. Participating students are encouraged to share their thoughts on the film and photos of their experience on social media, using the hash tag #SelmaForStudents.

“We don’t get out like this so much so it’s something different for the students to experience, seeing an educational movie while having fun at the same time,” said Amanda Sherwood, 13, of Orange, New Jersey.

Terrell and many of the business leaders involved were pleasantly surprised by the overwhelming enthusiasm for the program and how rapidly it all came together. “The kids will know that there are African-Americans who cared about their education, who found a special connection between this movie and their own lives, and wanted to pay it forward,” he said.

“Selma” — directed by Ava DuVernay– stars David Oyelow as Dr. King, and includes actors Tom Wilkinson as President Johnson, Cuba Gooding Jr., rapper Common, and Oprah Winfrey. “Selma” won a Golden Globe for Best Original Song and has been nominated for an Oscar for Best Original Song and Best Picture. 

“The police officers beating the peaceful protestors had the biggest impact on me. People have to understand the struggle African-Americans had to go through to vote. We take it for granted,” said Antonio Green, 13, who saw the movie twice this week in South Orange, New Jersey.

The free “Selma” tickets are available for students, while supplies last, through the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday, January 19.

Did you take advantage of this amazing offer? What did you think of the movie? Tell me in the comments.

Feminism gains momentum in 2014

Malala feminism moments of 2014 on carpoolcandy.com

I’m a feminist and you are too. The definition of a feminist is someone who believes that men and women should have equal rights.

Who can’t get on board with that?

There was probably a time in my youth when I didn’t identify as a feminist because the media, our culture, and mostly men put the term in a box. Feminists looked a certain way or were  portrayed as angry bitches.

We’re not bitches, but we are angry. And we should be.

We’re inching closer, but we’re still far from equal, and far from being respected and revered they way we deserve.

Take some time over this holiday break to read through some of the 39 Most Iconic Feminist Moments of 2014. The idea of men and women sharing equal rights shouldn’t be revolutionary, it should be a given. All the moments on the list are getting us closer to that.

Emma Waston feminism moments of 2014 on carpoolcandy.com

Actress Emma Watson’s address to the United Nations inspired me, actress Ellen Page outing herself during a speech at a Human Rights Campaign conference made me cry, and Aziz Ansari’s take on feminism on the Letterman show cracked me up.

Most of the list is filled with pop culture moments in TV, music, and movies, politics, and sports that may make you see feminism in a new light.

Emma Waston feminism moments of 2014 on carpoolcandy.com

There’s never been a more exciting time to be a woman or love and appreciate one. We’re changing the way our culture thinks, we’re feeling empowered, using those powers for good, and  affecting change.

Someday soon we may even get paid as much as men for doing the same job. We may get a lady in the White House.

A girl can dream, right?

Are you a proud feminist? Share your thoughts in the comments.

 

Remembering 9/11

I wrote the post below two years ago on September 11th. I was working on a different post today, but after hearing the victims’ names read once again, I really wanted to republish this one.

No one will ever forget where they were that day when the world was forever changed.

I was living in Manhattan, working at Fox News, and Jacob was a year old. I was so grateful that Wilson was working uptown. He had walked down many stairs from his office to escape the chaos after the first bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993.

In 2001, his office shut down and he eventually walked home with the throngs of confused, frightened people crowding the streets. I didn’t see him much that week and when I finally got home, I was obsessed with watching the news coverage, trying (in vain) to make sense of what happened…trying to feel the pain I had forced myself to numb while at work.

This is the rest of my story….

NeverForget-09-11-2001

I knew today was September 11th but I got the kids up and off to school like it was any other day. But when I returned from the bus stop, the TV was on and the victims’ relatives were reading the names of those they lost on that horrific day 11 years ago.

I was weeping within minutes. Even for the tenth time, hearing the names breaks my heart and brings me right back to that Manhattan day. It was a gorgeous, crisp autumn morning and the sky was remarkably clear and blue, before it exploded into fire and smoke and misery.

I was working at Fox News and basically lived at my desk for a week trying to tell the most shocking, tragic, and intense story of our lives. When I was able to get out of the office to catch a few hours of sleep, I could smell the ash and smoke in the air and saw the glazed, damaged looks of my fellow New Yorkers.

I remember seeing the “missing” flyers posted all over the city, and making trips to CVS to get contact lens solution, wipes, rubber gloves to bring to our local fire house to feel like we were doing something to help.

There are so many stories about the thousands of people touched by the attack. For the 10th anniversary, I wrote a series of articles for AOL’s Patch.com. I interviewed a New Jersey man who lost his brother-in-law and was so moved by the experience that when he retired a few years later, he started a fund to support people in crisis in his local community and support cultural events that bring people together.

You can read about TJ Hargrave– who was at his office at Cantor Fitzgerald when he died– and his brother-in-law’s inspiring story here. One of TJ’s daughters read his name this morning at the World Trade Center Memorial. I’m sure he would be so proud of her courage.

I also had the opportunity to interview several New Jersey firefighters last year — some of whom filled in at a Brooklyn fire house in the days following the attack. They tell a compelling tale with some chilling details about their experience in New York and what it’s like for them and their families to face risk every day. That story is here.

I always feel helpless when watching the families of 9/11 victims grieving. But reading these stories is a way to keep the memories of those we lost– and those who risked their lives to help– alive.

One thing we can do is never forget.